How To Do A Listing Presentation

When You Solve Their Problems – Only Then Do You Get Their Listing!

That’s all consumers want – as all of us buy products and services that resolve our problems. For example, you buy a lawn mower to solve your problem called ‘long grass’.

Well the same applies to sellers. They have 12 problems they want resolved before they’ll agree to list with you. By showing them the solution to these 12 problems, you’ll get their listing. And isn’t that the reason why you go on listing appointments in the first place!

1. First Impressions Do Count!

Let’s face it, first impressions do count. Would you take a buyer out to view homes driving a rusted out 1974 Buick? Would you attend a listing appointment wearing a tee shirt and shorts? Or how about giving a prospect a handwritten business card? Of course not, for you know image is critical for success. This is why it is essential for you to use only high quality, impressive and effective marketing materials to guarantee your success.

2. You May Not Like It, But Homeowners Do Judge A Book By Its Cover!

Image and impression are as equally important when it comes to the listing presentation itself. Just think of all the prospecting time and effort you’ve invested to book the listing appointment.

* Are you going to blow it all away by using a non-personalized, ineffective, company standard listing presentation?

* After all, you only have one chance at making a good impression!

And you need to invest only a few dollars to achieve exceptional ‘first impression’ results.

3. What Is The Homeowner Hearing From Other Agents?

Do you know that the average homeowner interviews 2 to 7 real estate agents before selecting one to list his home? This presents us with a question that is extremely important to success. What are these other agents telling the homeowner about the marketing strategies for his home?

* Public Open House

* Newspaper ads

* Local TV & radio ads

* Internet Exposure

* MLS Open House

* Office Open House

4. With Every Realtor Telling The Homeowner The Same Thing… Which Agent Do You Think The Homeowner Decides To Select As The Listing Agent?

The answer is… The one agent the homeowner is most impressed with when it comes to the content and appearance of the listing presentation itself.

5. What Do We Mean By Content & Appearance?

Perhaps this example will help us to effectively explain the issue. When you go to a grocery store and walk down the cereal aisle you’ll find manufacturers competing with each other for your business via professionally designed boxes that are exceptional in content and appearance. (Content means the words on the box and not the the cereal in the box.)

Why?

Well, corn flakes are corn flakes and they know it. So in efforts to make a distinction in the eyes of consumers over their competition, they invest literally tens of thousands of dollars in designing just the right looking box.

6. Therefore, Your Extra Advantage Over The Other Agents Is Found By…

Having a listing presentation that not only is great in content but is also visually impressive!

7. The Vast Majority of Homeowners Want To Be Educated Instead Of Sold By A Realtor!

Just put yourself into the back into the shoes of a homeowner for a moment! Would you want your Realtor using a ‘sales’ approach while on the listing presentation or would you rather prefer your Realtor to ‘fully explain’ every detail of the marketing process?

* The obvious answer is education.

And top listing agents understand this point and have designed their listing presentations to be educational instead of sales oriented. The end result are more listings with fewer problems!

8. And This Is What The ’12 Reasons Why To List With Me!’ Presentation Is All About!

It is for those agents who do not want to use sales tricks and gimmicks in an effort to get a listing. In plain language, they want to teach rather then sell homeowners into their services.

9. Why Do ‘Top Producers’ Use The ’12 Reasons Why To List With Me!’ Format?

There are two reasons why 83.7% of top producers choose this listing presentation format over all others available within the industry.

Reason #1: To Create Problems!

* Top producers value the power of problems. They understand problems, and their solutions, are the reasons why homeowners make the decision to list a home. However top producers approach these problems and solutions in an unique way.

* They do not wait for the homeowner to present a problem. Rather top producers ‘seed’ their listing presentation with specific problems. They then outline the solutions to these problems to the homeowner throughout the presentation. This strategy translates into more listings, more often than any other listing presentation style.

Reason #2: To Create Division!

* Top producers understand their listing presentations must cause the seller to agree to list before they discuss home pricing. This division between service and price is essential in terms of securing a listing.

* In fact, failure to separate service from price within a presentation is the #1 reason why average Realtors lose listings.

10. But That Does Not Need To Happen To You Anymore!

The “12 Reasons Why To List With Me!” listing solution will show you how to divide the listing presentation from the pricing presentation, allowing you to gain the commitment to list from the seller before you discuss price.

This results in an incredible explosion in listing success. And listings are the name of the game for any Realtor who wants to earn $150,000 + per year!

Top 10 Ways to Butcher Your Presentation and How to Avoid Them

1. Getting there late.

Walking frantically into a room full of people who have been waiting for you to arrive can be an embarrassing situation. Unless you are a magician, you might as well turn around and leave. It would take a miracle to get this audience to forget the inconvenience you have caused them. They probably have already passed judgment on you, deciding you’re an inconsiderate speaker rather than a viable expert in your field. Make the extra effort to arrive at least 1/2 hour before the event begins.

2. Apologizing before you start.

Starting off your presentation with “Uh, I’m sorry that I . . .” is the quickest, most assured way to lose your audience’s attention and leave them cold. Remember, YOU are the expert and true experts have nothing to be sorry for. The audience doesn’t care if you have a cold, woke up late, got caught in traffic, or tripped on a banana skin. All they care about is what information you’re going to give them that will benefit them in the shortest amount of time. Remember Love Story-”Love means never having to say you’re sorry.”

3. Not having a clear purpose.

Not having a clearly defined purpose for speaking is like driving to a restaurant in another city without a clue about how to get there. You’ll end up meandering, not really going anywhere, until finally the people in the car with you get frustrated, lose their patience, and take a mental exit, determined never to ride with you again. Decide why you are speaking, and to whom, and stick to it.

4. Pacing while you speak.

Walking back and forth is a BIG distraction to your audience. Not only will their necks hurt after the game of Ping-Pong that you just put them through, but you’ll have them anxiously wondering “Is this ever going to stop!?” Pacing keeps the audience from hearing what you’re saying. Movement is good; it keeps a presentation lively and interesting. However, it’s important to move with a purpose instead of meandering.

5. Swaying in the wind.

Like pacing, swaying in front of an audience is a HUGE no-no. Not only is it a distraction, it may even make your audience seasick. The best way to keep from swaying is to stand in the rooted position, which is when both feet are shoulder-length apart. Standing in this position will create a look of confidence and eliminate the temptation to sway.

6. Leaning on the lectern.

A surefire way to lose your audience’s confidence is to lean on the lectern. Not only does this casual style show a lack of respect to both the audience and the lectern, it also gives the appearance of a sloppy speaker. Treat the lectern as you would your child. Never lean on it, hit it, or leave it unattended.

7. Speaking in a monotone voice.

Speaking in a one-dimensional, monotone voice is boring, boring, boring. If you deliver your presentation using only one vocal pitch and rate, you’ll surely put your audience to sleep. People can’t grasp your message if they’re snoring. Therefore, it’s important to create excitement and keep interest by using a variety of vocal tones, pitches, and rates when you speak.

8. Avoiding eye contact.

The old adage “look above your audience’s head” is a bunch of hogwash and should never be done. If you don’t look at your audience, they’ll soon lose interest and ignore you, too. To reach your audience, you must connect with them. The best way to do this is by looking them directly in the eyes as you speak. That doesn’t mean you stare at them. It means you look at each person for about three to four seconds, then move on to the next person. Be careful not to bop your head from one side of the room to the other. Instead, slowly move from one person to the next in a sweeping motion.

9. Using the wrong hand gestures.

Inappropriate hand gestures such as placing your hands in your pockets or flailing them can be as distracting as pacing the floor. Keep hands and arms comfortably at your side ready to jump up and make a meaningful gesture. The best gestures are those that demonstrate an action or a point of measure. All gestures should add to the understanding of the message, not be distractions.

10. Taking a mental exit.

Forgetting what you’re going to say can really mess up a presentation. It can cause great awkwardness and often is hard to cover up. Typically, speakers forget what they’re going to say because they have either memorized their speech or relied too heavily on their notes. If this happens, simply return to the lectern, look down at your notes, pause and look up at your audience, and deliver the next line. The main message here is to not panic. Never let your audience see you sweat.

For more tips and articles, visit http://www.instantprospeaker.com

Guidelines to Making a Successful Presentation

A lot of people have no fear of standing up in public and making a presentation.
They have all the self confidence that it takes, and they have been doing it for so long that they tend to pour scorn on those who quake at the knees at the very thought. However it may not necessarily mean that an experienced presenter has nothing new to learn. And if your are one of these people who will have to face up to the challenges of making a presentation in the near future, here are a few tips on how to make a presentation that works.

1. How to prepare the content.

Before you enter into the line of fire, be it for the first time or the 500th, the presenter needs to do research. Not just on the material to be presented. Not just on how it should be presented. Not just on the audience that it will be presented to. But all of them together. A novice presenter should try to imagine himself as a member of the audience, and feel how the presentation should be made.

They should be well aware of which multimedia program they will be using as an aid, and how it operates. Making a few trial runs before an objective audience to iron out any potential glitches will only increase the presenter’s confidence in facing the real thing.

2. How to present the content

The thing that many “experienced “presenters will tend to forget in time, is to differentiate between a presentation and a speech. He or she may be the wittiest and most original speaker, but if they leave their audience laughing, but asking themselves, “what exactly were they trying to tell us”, and then nothing has been achieved. On the other hand, a scenario that is almost as dry as the Sahara Desert is when the presentation evolves from an often extremely lengthy prepared document. They can stand there for what seems like an eternity, but in reality is only 20 minutes, droning on in a dull monotone. In many cases these speakers will be speaking in a language that is not their native one. To add a little color to the proceedings, they might add in a few slides, which may well be upside down.

The ideal presentation is when the speaker combines an interesting but short lecture backed up by a PowerPoint presentation to emphasize their points. They will know or will have learned that audiences as a rule do not necessarily take notes at presentations. Therefore the professional presenter will have made sure that each member of the audience will have received the presentation in a printed or digital format. This will allow the content to be reviewed any time in the future.
This formula of presentation stands the best chance of meeting the approval of the audience, and being remembered positively.

3. How to wind up the presentation.

Assuming that the presenter has learned the first two steps inside out, and is now standing in front of an audience that will now be eating out of the presenter’s hand. This is the time that a successful presentation should be wound down. The best way to do that is to invite a few questions from the audience. This can continue for a few minutes, until everyone in the audience has had enough, and are ready to move on to the next speaker. The presenter can move unobtrusively behind the scenes, and give themselves a pat on the back.

All the hard work, thought and preparation that went into a preparation that works has been worthwhile!